Quality matters – local matters

Women’s Health Matters is an independent, non-partisan think tank that works to improve the health and wellbeing of women in the ACT and surrounding region.

We advocate on behalf of all ACT women, especially those experiencing disadvantage and vulnerability.

We seek to improve the health and wellbeing of anyone who identifies as a woman.

Knowing Communicating Influencing Empowering women in Doing what matters!

Women’s Health Matters is committed to reconciliation and acknowledges the First Australians whose cultures are among the oldest living cultures in human history, as the traditional custodians of this continent. We also recognise the history of dispossession experienced by the First Australians and the impact this has and continues to have on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders. We recognise the Ngunnawal People as the traditional custodians of the land on which we live and work, and pay our respects to their Elders past, present and emerging. We recognise the strength of Aboriginal women and their continuing connection and contribution to this land, these waters, and our communities. May we walk gently and treat the earth and each other with care and respect.

Have you or someone you know experienced sexual assault in the ACT?

We need your input.

Women’s Health Matters wants to better understand women’s experiences seeking help in the ACT, and their views about the services and support that they received.

We understand that women seeking help following a sexual assault have diverse circumstances and needs, meaning that there is no single best response that will be suitable for all women. Rather, there needs to be a range of responses available.

The findings from this research will better help us understand the ways in which ACT women seek help following a sexual assault, the services and supports they access, as well as when and why they choose to do it in such a way. We will use this research to advocate to improve responses in the ACT for women seeking help following a sexual assault.

The survey can be accessed here.

You can support us by sharing our Facebook or Linkedin posts.

Facebook posts

If Dolly Doctor didn’t answer all of your questions on periods, you may have found your answers in our library of books on menstruation. In 2004 we conducted workshops with mothers of daughters between 8-12 years to support them navigate period talk with their daughters. Books from our library, including ‘The Period Book,’ ‘The Puberty Book,’ and ‘Before She Gets Her Period’ were readily available for borrowing. “The Centre is particularly interested in transforming inherited views of embarrassment and shame around menstruation to a positive and empowering experience, and helping young women tune into the cycles of nature through their own menstrual cycles.” #womenshealthmatters ... See MoreSee Less
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Right now is the time to make sure your voice is heard in this urgent consultation survey! Women’s Health Matters is working now with the ACT government about what is needed to improve supports and services for ACT women who have experienced sexual assault, and we need your input to inform those changes. Share and complete our survey today >>> www.surveymonkey.com/r/DB36LZM?fbclid=IwAR05OWLJZqCBAZB0BK0YdhaL7GntkUKKHYxzngghR_JQAYvAp6UR1svXurg #womenshealthmattersHave you or someone you know experienced sexual assault in the ACT? We need your input.Women’s Health Matters wants to better understand women’s experiences seeking help in the ACT, and their views about the services and support that they received. We understand that women seeking help following a sexual assault have diverse circumstances and needs, meaning that there is no single best response that will be suitable for all women. Rather, there needs to be a range of responses available.The findings from this research will better help us understand the ways in which ACT women seek help following a sexual assault, the services and supports they access, as well as when and why they choose to do it in such a way. We will use this research to advocate to improve responses in the ACT for women seeking help following a sexual assault. The survey can be accessed at www.surveymonkey.com/r/DB36LZM#womenshealthmatters ... See MoreSee Less
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In 2003, Women’s Centre for Health Matters was the public contact point for Endometriosis ACT, and assisted in organising awareness raising events. The events included a media launch of Endometriosis Awareness Week by Australian World Champion Olympic swimmer, Petria Thomas, at the Canberra Hospital. Petria spoke about her experience of endometriosis and her journey to being diagnosed after suffering abdominal pains for a year. “It is quite a frightening disease and it can have such a huge effect on a woman’s life, not only on her personal life but her work life and her social life.” (ABC News, 2003)March is known as Endometriosis Awareness Month, and the Women’s Centre for Health Matters continues to support Endo ACT and advocate for education, resources, and research into the condition. #womenshealthmatters #endometriosis ... See MoreSee Less
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In 2002, the “Status of Women in the ACT” report noted that the marginalisation and isolation of women in the ACT was a significant issue.Incentives in the 2001/02 ACT budget provided additional counselling services for women. Women’s Health Matters ran a counselling service called Women’s Words, which was a critical and effective preventative and early intervention strategy in the area of depression which at the time was an enormous and growing health issue for women. #womenshealthmatters ... See MoreSee Less
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In 2001, we continued our community development work with women with a focus on body image and eating issues. Four groups were run by Women’s Centre for Health Matters- Enjoying Being Me, Nourishing Ourselves, Nourishing Ourselves for New Mothers, and Living Large. A narrative therapy approach was used in the group facilitation and we witnessed real changes in the lives of the women who participated. #womenshealthmatters ... See MoreSee Less
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We give voice to the voiceless. We make the invisible visible.

Women do health differently. Our research and advocacy is informed by women for women.

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